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  • capcat
    replied
    Below is my favorite salsa. Tastes really fresh. It can be ordered online if your local grocery doesn't carry it. Made in Frisco, Texas:
    http://www.mateossalsa.com

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  • Uncle Dave
    replied
    Originally posted by Blue Heaven View Post
    ^ No cilantro?
    LOL. I love cilantro but didn't like what I saw at Kroger. Maybe next time.

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  • Blue Heaven
    replied
    ^ No cilantro?

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  • Uncle Dave
    replied
    I've experienced a culinary breakthrough!!!! I fixed guacamole that didn't really suck. What I've fixed in the past hogs wouldn't eat. THIS time I made sure my avocados were really ripe. Used homegrown tomatoes and onions, sea salt, cumin, and lime juice. I tried to keep it as chunky as possible. Spread this on homemade corn torillas with homemade chorizo, more homegrown tomatoes, and homegrown romaine. Added a dash of hot sauce and found myself on the gravy train with biscuit wheels!!!

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  • Blue Heaven
    replied
    Sounds good Uncle Dave! I will definitely be making that. We love Asian inspired food at our house.
    You need to look up The Virtual Weber Bullet on the web. They have a recipe section in there and there are quite a few Asian recipes that sound fantastic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Uncle Dave
    replied
    Originally posted by CATHYnKY View Post

    Sounds delish. Problem is how often would I use the Hoisin sauce and 5 spice? Seems like it would get wasted. Do you have other uses for them?
    I use ALOT of Hoisin Sauce through the year. I make this sauce 3-4 times a year so I go through a bunch. My friends love it!! I use Lee Kum Kee(Amazon), which is actually domestic, in 36oz bottles now. From what I have read(from Chinese books) it's recommended for beef stir fry, but is considered to "heavy" for chicken. I usually use oyster sauce or a spicey Sezchuan sauce for chicken stir fry. Regarding 5 spice powder, it's optional, but I use it because the taste is incredible. I just ordered a 1/4 cup from Penzey's...should be here Monday. I also use it in a Chinese vegetable-beef soup with noodles or dumplings.

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  • CATHYnKY
    replied
    Originally posted by Uncle Dave View Post
    I LOVE Chinese bbq(Char Siu) and wanted to share this with you all!! This is my go-to recipe and I promise you it's incredible on pork and chicken(thighs), roasted in the oven or cooked on the grill. I slice the loin into 2" x 6" pieces......

    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/23...isMetric=false

    -I don't use food coloring.
    -I add 5-6 cloves of diced fresh garlic and a TBSP or more of diced fresh ginger root to the marinade.
    -If you like lots of sauce, make 50% more marinade, add 1-2 tsps of corn starch, and simmer until thick. Add towards the end of cooking and cook until it begins to crispen up a bit(put under the broiler if you want, but be careful you don't incinerate the meat).
    Sounds delish. Problem is how often would I use the Hoisin sauce and 5 spice? Seems like it would get wasted. Do you have other uses for them?

    Leave a comment:


  • Uncle Dave
    replied
    I LOVE Chinese bbq(Char Siu) and wanted to share this with you all!! This is my go-to recipe and I promise you it's incredible on pork and chicken(thighs), roasted in the oven or cooked on the grill. I slice the loin into 2" x 6" pieces......

    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/23...isMetric=false

    -I don't use food coloring.
    -I add 5-6 cloves of diced fresh garlic and a TBSP or more of diced fresh ginger root to the marinade.
    -If you like lots of sauce, make 50% more marinade, add 1-2 tsps of corn starch, and simmer until thick. Add towards the end of cooking and cook until it begins to crispen up a bit(put under the broiler if you want, but be careful you don't incinerate the meat).

    Leave a comment:


  • Blue Heaven
    replied
    1. Get a couple slabs of your favorite ribs, be it beef or pork. Pull of the membrane and pat dry with paper towels.
    2. Apply some mustard all over the ribs and apply your favorite rub. I used Bad Byron's Butt Rub but cut it with A LOT of brown sugar as I am not a big salt fan on my meat.
    3. Set up the smoker for 225-250. Add a couple chunks of wood. I used 3 handfuls of whiskey barrel chips. DO NOT SOAK! Add it to the coals once 225-250 has been reached.
    4. Put ribs on the top rack. I use a bullet smoker. Add additional slabs to the bottom grate if necessary.
    5. Cook for 2.5 hours at 225-250
    6. Pull ribs off. Grab a foil sheet big enough to wrap a slab and squirt butter, honey, and add a handful of brown sugar to each sheet. Lay ribs meat side down and lather the other side with your favorite BBQ sauce. I cut Sweet Baby Ray's with apple juice, apple cider vinegar, and the rub I use for the ribs.
    7. Wrap tight and place ribs back on the smoker meat side down for an additional 1.5-2 hours.
    8. Remove ribs. Open foil and baste with the juice. Leave unwrapped and let sit for 20 minutes.
    9. These are the best ribs I have ever had. ABSOLUTELY KILLER! I ate these with cole slaw, baked beans and mac-n-cheese. I put these ribs up against any chain restaurant.
    10. This isn't my recipe. I found it online. These are great. Any rib person will love them.
    Last edited by Blue Heaven; 04-02-2018, 10:04 PM.

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  • Dwight Schrute
    replied
    I have a gas grill that I do most of my outdoor cooking on, but I always bring out the Weber Kettle for steak. I don't cook big premium cuts of beef very often, but last night, I cooked a ribeye that was out of this world. It was an 18 oz prime ribeye about 2" thick from the Kroger butcher counter that I got for a belated birthday meal. I've always been skeptical of people who boast that their home grilled steaks are as good as high end steakhouses. Not because of their abilities, but the equipment. But now I see how it's done.

    I started by salting it liberally and putting it on a wire rack in the fridge for a few hours. The salt draws out the moisture from the fibers and breaks down the muscle fibers making your beef really, really tender. I used lump hardwood charcoal (instead of briquettes) which gets a fire hotter than anything you can get in an oven or a gas grill. I added some pepper and garlic powder, and used the reverse sear method where I cook it on the "cool" zone of the grill until the internal temperature reached 105 degrees. Then I threw that sucker over the fire and let the intense heat get a nice crust on it. I rotated it every few seconds to get it uniformly crispy on the exterior. I pulled it off about 125 and let it rest while I grilled some asparagus.

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  • Dwight Schrute
    replied
    Originally posted by Uncle Dave View Post
    Yesterday I was off and used this spectacular day to.........charcoal grill some 1/2 lb. burgers. 25% brisket, 75% chuck, all freshly ground. First (cheese) burger of the year always hits the spot after a long, cold winter.
    I'm planning on doing the same thing tonight. Not freshly ground beef but a charcoal grilled burger always hits the spot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Uncle Dave
    replied
    Yesterday I was off and used this spectacular day to.........charcoal grill some 1/2 lb. burgers. 25% brisket, 75% chuck, all freshly ground. First (cheese) burger of the year always hits the spot after a long, cold winter.

    Leave a comment:


  • CATHYnKY
    replied
    Originally posted by Dwight Schrute View Post
    I made the best chili I've ever made yesterday, and it's one I just threw together. I'm going to recap it here so I can reference it back later, lol. I used:
    1 lb ground chicken seasoned with adobo spices
    1 lb ground chorizo
    2 poblano peppers
    1 onion (yellow)
    3-4 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce
    3-4 bulbs fresh garlic
    1 can kidney beans
    1 can Rotel
    1 can fire roasted tomatoes
    Roughly a tsp each of garlic powder, chili powder, chipotle powder adobo powder, and salt/pepper.

    Cook the meat first, then remove and set aside. Cook the peppers, onions, and garlic in the chorizo grease. Then add the meat back in and the rest of the ingredients. Let it simmer for as long as you possibly can. Serve with cornbread in a cast iron skillet.
    Sounds a tad too spicy for me. I made a pot a couple of days ago for the weekend. It has a kick, but not to the point you have to gulp water after each bite.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwight Schrute
    replied
    I made the best chili I've ever made yesterday, and it's one I just threw together. I'm going to recap it here so I can reference it back later, lol. I used:
    1 lb ground chicken seasoned with adobo spices
    1 lb ground chorizo
    2 poblano peppers
    1 onion (yellow)
    3-4 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce
    3-4 bulbs fresh garlic
    1 can kidney beans
    1 can Rotel
    1 can fire roasted tomatoes
    Roughly a tsp each of garlic powder, chili powder, chipotle powder adobo powder, and salt/pepper.

    Cook the meat first, then remove and set aside. Cook the peppers, onions, and garlic in the chorizo grease. Then add the meat back in and the rest of the ingredients. Let it simmer for as long as you possibly can. Serve with cornbread in a cast iron skillet.

    Leave a comment:


  • CATHYnKY
    replied
    Not lately. But then my stomach ain’t was it used to be 😉

    Leave a comment:

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