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The Monkees' Surviving Members Mourn Peter Tork's Death

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  • The Monkees' Surviving Members Mourn Peter Tork's Death

    The Monkees' surviving members Micky Dolenz and Mike Nesmith have commented on the death of fellow group member Peter Tork, who died Feb. 21. He was 77.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/news...Pa7?li=BBnb7Kz
    Philippians 4:11 & 4:13

  • #2
    They were the first concert I ever attended lol. This was a long time ago...I'm thinking 1964 or there abouts. It was at Freedom Hall. The lights were left on, and sure enough, hundreds of young ladies were screaming their heads off like they were watching The Beatles. I'm still not sure if the music was live or taped, but it sounded good. RIP Peter Tork.

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    • #3
      RIP Peter Tork....The monkees' was my childhood

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      • #4
        Personality wise they were a bit too cheesy for my taste, but they did record several songs that I really like.
        Philippians 4:11 & 4:13

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Matt Dillon View Post
          Personality wise they were a bit too cheesy
          Being that the whole thing was initiated as a parody, that was the point.
          I feel sorry for people who don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're gonna feel all day. Frank Sinatra

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Uncle Dave View Post
            They were the first concert I ever attended lol. This was a long time ago...I'm thinking 1964 or there abouts. It was at Freedom Hall. The lights were left on, and sure enough, hundreds of young ladies were screaming their heads off like they were watching The Beatles. I'm still not sure if the music was live or taped, but it sounded good. RIP Peter Tork.
            That Freedom Hall show was on December 28,1968. It was The Monkees’ third concert appearance, excluding a sort of warm up in Honolulu at the start of the month, away from the mainland press. They hit the road hard: 12/26, Denver Coliseum; 12/27, Mid South Coliseum in Memphis; 12/28, Freedom Hall; 12/29, Winston-Salem Coliseum; 12/30, Pittsburgh Civic Arena: 12/31, Cincinnati Gardens; 1/1, Nashville Municipal Auditorium; 1/2, Tulsa Assembly Center Arena. They undertook some pretty relentless travel and performing schedules, all packed in between rehearsals, studio recording, promotional appearances, and the grind of filming the TV show. Peter Tork quit at the end of 1968 because he was exhausted.

            They did play the songs live, but they were hard to hear over all the screaming. Three of their 1967 shows were recorded and released starting in the late 1980s. Unfortunately I don’t think there are any recordings around from the shows Jimi Hendrix opened for them.

            I have wondered if anyone in Louisville, maybe someone involved with promoters, recorded any 1960s concerts in town, like this one, or The Doors’ Halloween 1968 show at Freedom Hall. Lots of recordings of concerts in other cities have turned up over the years, but the only Louisville recording I know of from those years was the Grateful Dead, who welcomed tapers at their shows.
            Last edited by Old School; 01-27-2020, 06:56 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Matt Dillon View Post
              Personality wise they were a bit too cheesy for my taste, but they did record several songs that I really like.
              Like many bands, they played songs written by others and used studio musicians to varying degrees. They had some exceptional writers giving them material, like Carole King, Neil Diamond, Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart, and they eventually found a great balance between their own playing and use of studio musicians when recording. Much of the resulting output was outstanding, and still holds up well.

              Their third album, on which on one performed except them (and their producer on bass here and there), is a real artifact of exuberant, optimistic, youthful, naive 1960s California, kind of what dreamers think the 60s were like for everyone.

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              The Monkees' Surviving Members Mourn Peter Tork's Death

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