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  • Gardening

    Is anyone giving it a shot this spring, especially with vegetables?

  • #2
    Yep. Usually wait till around Mother's Day to plant. We usually just grow squash, green peppers, banana peppers, jalapenos, tomatoes, and cucumbers.
    Isaiah 5:20

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    • #3
      My wife and I are planning on putting out a few tomato plants.
      "There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, that it behooves us all not to talk about the rest of us." Robert Louis Stevenson

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      • #4
        Yes, I have a nice garden in the works. My dear grandma from Marion County taught me before I was even in grade school. All organic. Potatoes,carrots, broccoli, cabbage, red onions, bush beans, shelling peas, garlic, thyme, oregano, rosemary, flat leaf parsley. I have flats of tomatoes, heirloom tomatoes, paprika, sage, and more lettuce I'm getting ready to harden off and plant around the 15th. I use raised beds and I have 320 sq. ft. of actual growing space. I also have two bins that I make compost in. I'm a garden geek if there ever was one.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Uncle Dave View Post
          Yes, I have a nice garden in the works. My dear grandma from Marion County taught me before I was even in grade school. All organic. Potatoes,carrots, broccoli, cabbage, red onions, bush beans, shelling peas, garlic, thyme, oregano, rosemary, flat leaf parsley. I have flats of tomatoes, heirloom tomatoes, paprika, sage, and more lettuce I'm getting ready to harden off and plant around the 15th. I use raised beds and I have 320 sq. ft. of actual growing space. I also have two bins that I make compost in. I'm a garden geek if there ever was one.
          Do you used raised beds exclusively? And do you have to plow/till the ground beneath your beds? My wife and I want to start some beds but we've yet to pull the trigger.

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          • #6
            Growing up on a farm, we had a huge garden with all the vegetables. Now I only plant flowers. Two slow release fertilizers I use are Holly Tone and Ozmacote. (sp) I put Holly Tone on the ground and till it in. When I plant I sprinkle Ozmacote in the hole then the plant. Works great. OBTW Holly Tone can be used on everything green or blooming.
            John 3:3

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            • #7
              Yes, I use raise beds exclusively...4 ft x 20 ft x 8in. Two years ago I replaced all of the rotting wood 2 x 10s (they lasted 5 years) with half concrete blocks. I use whole block for the ends and I plant stuff in the holes. Best thing I ever did. They were cheaper(Lowe's) per linear foot than pressure treated lumber and way cheaper than cedar. Takes a while to settle, but I don't really mess with them too much. I would till the ground and remove any bermuda grass roots and rhizomes. If your beds are deep, say 2 ft. or deeper, you can use logs, brush, or leaves to help fill the void. In other words, till, add fill that will compost, then add your soil. They all will compost given time and it's a LOT cheaper than filling the beds with all soil/compost. The soil will settle so you will have to do a re-fill job. Go to a garden center that sells quality bulk compost or top soil and have them deliver if feasible. In my experience the stuff from big box stores sucks(rocks, wood chips, pine cones, etc) even though it is cheaper. My soil is to the point that I don't till or turn with a fork. I dig a very small hole or trench, plant sets or seeds, and I'm done. I'm building a low tunnel green house this fall. I'm pumped. I plan to harvest something 12 months out of the year.

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              • #8
                I graduated from UK's College of Agriculture a long time ago. I majored in Animal Science but I took many hours of courses related to Agronomy and growing row crops. I retired two years ago and became a volunteer with Jefferson County Extension and I work for the Agent for Horticulture Education. Another UK grad. She has me working with Catholic Relief Charities and a program called the Incubator Farm. It's working with refugees who already have experience in growing and selling their product at farmer's markets and learning how to run their own business. I also work with recovering drugs addicts and non-violent felons through the Volunteers of America. I strongly recommend this publication on gardening here in KY. It's excellent.....http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agcomm/pubs/id/id128/id128.pdf..

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Uncle Dave View Post
                  Yes, I use raise beds exclusively...4 ft x 20 ft x 8in. Two years ago I replaced all of the rotting wood 2 x 10s (they lasted 5 years) with half concrete blocks. I use whole block for the ends and I plant stuff in the holes. Best thing I ever did. They were cheaper(Lowe's) per linear foot than pressure treated lumber and way cheaper than cedar. Takes a while to settle, but I don't really mess with them too much. I would till the ground and remove any bermuda grass roots and rhizomes. If your beds are deep, say 2 ft. or deeper, you can use logs, brush, or leaves to help fill the void. In other words, till, add fill that will compost, then add your soil. They all will compost given time and it's a LOT cheaper than filling the beds with all soil/compost. The soil will settle so you will have to do a re-fill job. Go to a garden center that sells quality bulk compost or top soil and have them deliver if feasible. In my experience the stuff from big box stores sucks(rocks, wood chips, pine cones, etc) even though it is cheaper. My soil is to the point that I don't till or turn with a fork. I dig a very small hole or trench, plant sets or seeds, and I'm done. I'm building a low tunnel green house this fall. I'm pumped. I plan to harvest something 12 months out of the year.
                  This is very helpful. I really appreciate you taking the time to share your knowledge.

                  You ever heard the term "barn litter"? It's what my papaw and dad call the soil and composted barn material that falls beneath the barn floor over time. My pap gardened all his life until he couldn't anymore, and he swears that stuff is the absolute best soil you can get your hands on. My dad bought a farm a couple years ago, tore down the old barn (which was made entirely of wormy chestnut, btw -- major score there) and he now has a mountain of "barn litter" sitting on his property. If you think it'd work, I could definitely get a few scoops of that to fill my beds if we do decide to give it a shot.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Uncle Dave View Post
                    I graduated from UK's College of Agriculture a long time ago. I majored in Animal Science but I took many hours of courses related to Agronomy and growing row crops. I retired two years ago and became a volunteer with Jefferson County Extension and I work for the Agent for Horticulture Education. Another UK grad. She has me working with Catholic Relief Charities and a program called the Incubator Farm. It's working with refugees who already have experience in growing and selling their product at farmer's markets and learning how to run their own business. I also work with recovering drugs addicts and non-violent felons through the Volunteers of America. I strongly recommend this publication on gardening here in KY. It's excellent.....http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agcomm/pubs/id/id128/id128.pdf..
                    Your work sounds fascinating (and noble; well done, sir). Thank you for the link. Looking at it now.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for that link Uncle Dave.
                      Isaiah 5:20

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Downes Van Zandt View Post

                        This is very helpful. I really appreciate you taking the time to share your knowledge.

                        You ever heard the term "barn litter"? It's what my papaw and dad call the soil and composted barn material that falls beneath the barn floor over time. My pap gardened all his life until he couldn't anymore, and he swears that stuff is the absolute best soil you can get your hands on. My dad bought a farm a couple years ago, tore down the old barn (which was made entirely of wormy chestnut, btw -- major score there) and he now has a mountain of "barn litter" sitting on his property. If you think it'd work, I could definitely get a few scoops of that to fill my beds if we do decide to give it a shot.
                        I would jump on that in a New York minute. Can't beat the price. What you don't use maybe get the missus to bag and sell it. I ordered 4 cubic yards of compost delivered to one of the VOA Recovery Centers back in March and it cost 320.00 or so delivered. IF you all start, start small.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Downes Van Zandt View Post

                          Your work sounds fascinating (and noble; well done, sir). Thank you for the link. Looking at it now.
                          You're a kind soul...I appreciate it. At this point in my life I love going to work, particularly as a representative of UK and also as a volunteer.

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                          • #14
                            You guys are way over my head. I just do simple stuff, but the results are very pretty. I live in a patio home community and can't do much because of the by-laws.
                            John 3:3

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lighthouse View Post
                              You guys are way over my head. I just do simple stuff, but the results are very pretty. I live in a patio home community and can't do much because of the by-laws.
                              If you think it's pretty that's the ONLY thing that matters.

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