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The Official Last Movie You Saw Thread (Part 2)

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  • I suppose I should go a little bit deeper on a couple of the flicks that seem like I dismissed completely on my one-word review above:

    Green Book was a fine film -- the performances were excellent, and it was competently made. It was a feel-good flick centered on racism, but that's where the problem comes in for me. We know that racism existed in the south in the 50s (and now, for that matter). We know it's bad. I don't think this movie presented anything differently. It was still good, though, and I think a lot of the folks on this site would enjoy it.

    The Favourite - I said it was a snooze, but that's not quite accurate. I typically hate this type of stuffy British period piece, but this one is considerably different. It's still stuffy, and it's still a British period piece, but it's decidedly strange -- peppered with obscenity, graphic sex, and the type of palace intrigue that made the early seasons of"Game of Thrones" so entertaining. I still wouldn't recommend it to most people, but for those with a taste for offbeat movies, this might be up your alley. Plus the lead performance by the lady who played the Queen was astonishing -- she's a shoo-in for the Best Actress Oscar.

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    • Originally posted by Will Lavender View Post
      Leave No Trace.

      Watched this on KC's recommendation and I'm glad I did. This isn't the kind of movie you watch if you want riveting, breathless entertainment. There are no chase scenes or stunning reversals, no suspenseful twists as the score swells in the background. This is a character study, and in character studies the actors have to carry their weight. And the two leads do, particularly the daughter, who's played by 18-year-old Thomasin McKenzie. She's brilliant in this, and as the movie goes on you realize that it's her movie and that everything that happens is really a reflection on her power and her future. The realization of what this film is "about" is a revelation, and that gives the movie as much of a kick as any twist ending could.

      My highest recommendation and one of the best things I saw that was made in 2018.
      I know he wasn't a bad guy and he loved his daughter, but didn't you just want to slap Ben Foster's character upside his head the entire movie?

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      • Originally posted by KCKUKFan View Post

        I know he wasn't a bad guy and he loved his daughter, but didn't you just want to slap Ben Foster's character upside his head the entire movie?
        Yes.

        I liked that the movie didn't explain his PTSD or get into dramatic flashbacks or anything. We don't even get an explanation of why he is why he is. To me that gave the film this air of mystery that made it that much more riveting.

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        • Netflix's Fyre Festival Documentary... As a concept, the story of entitled, wealthy, narcissists scamming wealthy, entitled, party-douche-millennials into a costly lord of the flies situation seems like a good time. It wasn't as nearly as fun as I hoped. The actual pain, damage, and human suffering caused by these people is incredible and depressing, as all these juicy scams turn out to be.

          Chuck Schumer's press secretary makes a brief but delightful appearance... Given my disdain for Schumer, seeing one of his functionaries in cahoots with legendary con-artists Billy McFarland and Ja Rule was the highlight.
          Jordan Peterson is my spirit animal...

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          • Originally posted by Will Lavender View Post
            Won't You Be My Neighbor?

            Mr. Rogers was one of my childhood heroes, as he was for so many kids in my generation. For such a simplistic concept--many of the puppets were voiced by Rogers himself; there were long movements where Rogers would just sit there, saying nothing and staring into the camera--there was something hypnotic about the show, and this doc explores why that was and how Rogers understood kids so deeply. It also digs into Rogers' life a little (but only a little), and touches on how the show began in Pittsburgh and how it became one of the most influential children's programs of all time. For all of Rogers' brilliance, you can't help but getting a little annoyed by him simply because he was so unusual. And really the question the movie asks is one that can't be answered: "What was the deal with Mr. Rogers?"

            An emotional, sweet movie about one of the most transfixing public figures of the 20th century. Highly recommended.
            Saw this today. I was never annoyed by him. Mr. Rogers was a good man. The part about him truly loving the cop he never knew was gay is something we all should try to be. Just love people. At ALL TIMES no matter where they came from or what they are. That's hard to grasp for the skeptical folks but it's what we should all strive for. This documentary was GREAT and I absolutely loved it.
            No man is a failure who has friends

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            The Official Last Movie You Saw Thread (Part 2)

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